Controls on morphological variability and role of stream power distribution pattern, Yamuna river, western India

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dc.contributor.author Bawa, Nupur
dc.contributor.author Jain, Vikrant
dc.contributor.author Shekhar, Shashank
dc.contributor.author Kumar, Niraj
dc.contributor.author Jyani, Vikas
dc.date.accessioned 2014-06-26T06:35:03Z
dc.date.available 2014-06-26T06:35:03Z
dc.date.issued 2014-12
dc.identifier.citation Bawa, Nupur; Jain, Vikrant; Shekhar, Shashank; Kumar, Niraj and Jyani, Vikas, "Controls on morphological variability and role of stream power distribution pattern, Yamuna river, western India", Geomorphology, DOI: 10.1016/j.geomorph.2014.05.016, Dec. 2014. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0169-555X
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geomorph.2014.05.016
dc.identifier.uri https://repository.iitgn.ac.in/handle/123456789/1327
dc.description.abstract Understanding the controls on the morphological variability of river systems constitutes one of the fundamental questions in geomorphic investigation. Channel morphology is an important indicator of river processes and is of significance for mapping the hydrology-ecologic connectivity in a river system and for predicting the future trajectory of river health in response to external forcings. This paper documents the spatial morphological variability and its natural and anthropogenic controls for the Yamuna River, a major tributary of the Ganga River, India. The Yamuna River runs through a major urban centre i.e. Delhi National Capital Region. The Yamuna River was divided into eight geomorphically distinct reaches on the basis of the assemblages of geomorphic units and the association of landscape, valley and floodplain settings. The morphological variability was analysed through stream power distribution and sediment load data at various stations. Stream power distribution of the Yamuna River basin is characterised by a non-linear pattern that was used to distinguish (a) high energy ‘natural’ upstream reaches, (b) ‘anthropogenically altered’, low energy middle stream reaches, and (c) ‘rejuvenated’ downstream reaches again with higher stream power. The relationship between stream power and channel morphology in these reaches was integrated with sediment load data to define the maximum flow efficiency (MFE) as the threshold for geomorphic transition. This analysis supports the continuity of river processes and the significance of a holistic, basin-scale approach rather than isolated local scale analysis in river studies. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Nupur Bawaa, Vikrant Jain, Shashank Shekhar, Niraj Kumar and Vikas Jyani
dc.format.extent vol. 227, pp. 60-72
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.subject Anthropogenic impact on rivers en_US
dc.subject Channel morphology en_US
dc.subject Geomorphic threshold en_US
dc.subject Maximum flow efficiency en_US
dc.subject Stream power en_US
dc.subject Yamuna River India en_US
dc.title Controls on morphological variability and role of stream power distribution pattern, Yamuna river, western India en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.relation.journal Geomorphology


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