The impact of lifecourse socioeconomic position on cardiovascular disease events in African Americans: The Jackson heart study

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dc.contributor.author Gebreab, Samson Y.
dc.contributor.author Diez Roux, Ana V.
dc.contributor.author Brenner, Allison B.
dc.contributor.author Hickson, DeMarc A.
dc.contributor.author Sims, Mario
dc.contributor.author Subramanyam, Malavika A.
dc.contributor.author Griswold, Michael E.
dc.contributor.author Wyatte, Sharon B.
dc.contributor.author James, Sherman A.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-06-26T06:30:03Z
dc.date.available 2015-06-26T06:30:03Z
dc.date.issued 2015-05
dc.identifier.citation Gebreab, Samson Y.; Diez Roux, Ana V.; Brenner, Allison B.; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Sims, Mario; Subramanyam, Malavika; Griswold, Michael E.; Wyatt, Sharon B. and James, Sherman A., "The impact of lifecourse socioeconomic position on cardiovascular disease events in African Americans: The Jackson heart study", Journal of the American Heart Association, DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.114.001553, vol. 4, no. 6, pp. e001553-e001553, May 2015. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2047-9980
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.114.001553
dc.identifier.uri https://repository.iitgn.ac.in/handle/123456789/1775
dc.description.abstract Background Few studies have examined the impact of lifecourse socioeconomic position (SEP) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among African Americans. Methods and Results We used data from the Jackson Heart Study (JHS) to examine the associations of multiple measures of lifecourse SEP with CVD events in a large cohort of African Americans. During a median of 7.2‐year follow‐up, 362 new or recurrent CVD events occurred in a sample of 5301 participants aged 21 to 94. Childhood SEP was assessed by using mother's education, parental home ownership, and childhood amenities. Adult SEP was assessed by using education, income, wealth, and public assistance. Adult SEP was more consistently associated with CVD risk in women than in men: age‐adjusted hazard ratios for low versus high income (95% CIs), 2.46 (1.19 to 5.09) in women and 1.50 (0.87 to 2.58) in men, P for interaction=0.1244, and hazard ratio for low versus high wealth, 2.14 (1.39 to 3.29) in women and 1.06 (0.62 to 1.81) in men, P for interaction=0.0224. After simultaneous adjustment for all adult SEP measures, wealth remained a significant predictor of CVD events in women (HR=1.73 [1.04, 2.85] for low versus high). Education and public assistance were less consistently associated with CVD. Adult SEP was a stronger predictor of CVD events in younger than in older participants (HR for high versus low summary adult SEP score 3.28 [1.43, 7.53] for participants ≤50 years, and 1.90 (1.36 to 2.66) for participants >50 years, P for interaction 0.0846). Childhood SEP was not associated with CVD risk in women or men. Conclusions Adult SEP is an important predictor of CVD events in African American women and in younger African Americans. Childhood SEP was not associated with CVD events in this population. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Malavika, Subramanyam et al.
dc.format.extent Vol. 4, No. 6, pp. e001553-e001553
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Stroke Association en_US
dc.subject Adult SEP en_US
dc.subject African Americans en_US
dc.subject Cardiovascular disease events en_US
dc.subject Childhood SEP en_US
dc.subject Epidemiology en_US
dc.subject Lifecourse en_US
dc.subject Socioeconomic position en_US
dc.title The impact of lifecourse socioeconomic position on cardiovascular disease events in African Americans: The Jackson heart study en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.relation.journal Journal of the American Heart Association


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