Effects of convection and long-range transport on the distribution of carbon monoxide in the troposphere over India

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dc.contributor.author Chandra, Naveen
dc.contributor.author Venkataramani, S.
dc.contributor.author Lal, Shyam
dc.contributor.author Sheel, Varun
dc.contributor.author Pozzer, A.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-20T07:43:04Z
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-20T07:47:20Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-20T07:43:04Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-20T07:47:20Z
dc.date.issued 2016-09
dc.identifier.citation Chandra, Naveen; Venkataramani, S.; Lal, S.; Sheel, V. and Pozzer, A., “Effects of convection and long-range transport on the distribution of carbon monoxide in the troposphere over India”, Atmospheric Pollution Research, DOI: 10.1016/j.apr.2016.03.005, vol. 7, no. 5, pp. 775-785, Sep. 2016.
dc.identifier.issn 1309-1042
dc.identifier.uri https://repository.iitgn.ac.in/handle/123456789/2225
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apr.2016.03.005
dc.description.abstract Variability in the tropospheric distributions of carbon monoxide (CO) over five selected regions of India has been studied using the MOPITT data for the period of 2001–2014. The average seasonal profiles show highest mixing ratios at 900 hPa in the boreal winter and lowest in the Indian summer monsoon over all the study regions. We observe a slight increase in CO levels from 500 hPa to 200 hPa over all the locations. The CO mixing ratios are found to be higher by about 10–40% around 300–200 hPa as compared to 900 hPa over Ahmedabad, Hyderabad and Trivandrum during monsoon period. This could be due to lifting of polluted air by convection and getting trapped in the anticyclonic winds over the Indian region during the monsoon. Most of the 7 day back trajectories over these regions show transport of the polluted air mass from the major biomass burning regions of central Africa and SE Asia. The results show dominance of the seasonal amplitude at 900 hPa over all the regions, while inter-annual variability dominates mostly over Ahmedabad, Hyderabad and Trivandrum at 300 hPa. In order to check the ability of different models in capturing the observed variability, the results have been compared with simulations from two chemistry transport models (MOZART and EMAC). This comparison shows that both the models perform reasonably well in simulating the basic features such as annual variation as well as increase in CO around 300–200 hPa due to convection during the monsoon season.
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by N. Chandra, S. Venkataramani, S. Lal, V. Sheel and A. Pozzer
dc.format.extent vol. 7, no. 5, pp. 775-785
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Turkish National Committee for Air Pollution Research and Control en_US
dc.subject Long-range transport en_US
dc.subject Carbon monoxide en_US
dc.subject Troposphere over India en_US
dc.title Effects of convection and long-range transport on the distribution of carbon monoxide in the troposphere over India en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.relation.journal Atmospheric Pollution Research


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