A human-machine-interface integrating low-cost sensors with a neuromuscular electrical stimulation system for post-stroke balance rehabilitation

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dc.contributor.author Kumar, Deepesh
dc.contributor.author Das, Abhijit
dc.contributor.author Lahiri, Uttama
dc.contributor.author Dutta, Anirban
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-20T08:26:34Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-20T08:26:34Z
dc.date.issued 2016-04
dc.identifier.citation Kumar, Deepesh; Das, Abhijit; Lahiri, Uttama and Dutta, Anirban, “A human-machine-interface integrating low-cost sensors with a neuromuscular electrical stimulation system for post-stroke balance rehabilitation”, Journal of Visualized Experiments, DOI: 10.3791/52394, no. 110, Apr. 2016. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1940-087X
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/52394
dc.identifier.uri https://repository.iitgn.ac.in/handle/123456789/2227
dc.description.abstract A stroke is caused when an artery carrying blood from heart to an area in the brain bursts or a clot obstructs the blood flow to brain thereby preventing delivery of oxygen and nutrients. About half of the stroke survivors are left with some degree of disability. Innovative methodologies for restorative neurorehabilitation are urgently required to reduce long-term disability. The ability of the nervous system to reorganize its structure, function and connections as a response to intrinsic or extrinsic stimuli is called neuroplasticity. Neuroplasticity is involved in post-stroke functional disturbances, but also in rehabilitation. Beneficial neuroplastic changes may be facilitated with non-invasive electrotherapy, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and sensory electrical stimulation (SES). NMES involves coordinated electrical stimulation of motor nerves and muscles to activate them with continuous short pulses of electrical current while SES involves stimulation of sensory nerves with electrical current resulting in sensations that vary from barely perceivable to highly unpleasant. Here, active cortical participation in rehabilitation procedures may be facilitated by driving the non-invasive electrotherapy with biosignals (electromyogram (EMG), electroencephalogram (EEG), electrooculogram (EOG)) that represent simultaneous active perception and volitional effort. To achieve this in a resource-poor setting, e.g., in low- and middle-income countries, we present a low-cost human-machine-interface (HMI) by leveraging recent advances in off-the-shelf video game sensor technology. In this paper, we discuss the open-source software interface that integrates low-cost off-the-shelf sensors for visual-auditory biofeedback with non-invasive electrotherapy to assist postural control during balance rehabilitation. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept on healthy volunteers. en_US
dc.format.extent no. 110
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher JOVE en_US
dc.subject Neuroscience en_US
dc.subject Stroke en_US
dc.subject Movement Rehabilitation en_US
dc.subject Low-cost device en_US
dc.subject Operant Conditioning en_US
dc.subject Biofeedback training en_US
dc.subject Neuroplasticity en_US
dc.subject Standing Balance en_US
dc.title A human-machine-interface integrating low-cost sensors with a neuromuscular electrical stimulation system for post-stroke balance rehabilitation en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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