Fiber Bragg grating interrogation using wavelength modulated tunable distributed feedback lasers and a fiber-optic Mach–Zehnder interferometer

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dc.contributor.author Roy, Anirban
dc.contributor.author Chakraborty, Arup Lal
dc.contributor.author Jha, Chandan Kumar
dc.date.accessioned 2017-04-27T11:51:45Z
dc.date.available 2017-04-27T11:51:45Z
dc.date.issued 2017-04
dc.identifier.citation Roy, Anirban; Chakraborty, Arup Lal and Jha, Chandan Kumar, “Fiber Bragg grating interrogation using wavelength modulated tunable distributed feedback lasers and a fiber-optic Mach–Zehnder interferometer”, Applied Optics, DOI: 10.1364/AO.56.003562, vol. 56, no. 12, pp. 3562-3569, Apr. 2017. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1559-128X
dc.identifier.issn 2155-3165
dc.identifier.uri https://repository.iitgn.ac.in/handle/123456789/2890
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1364/AO.56.003562
dc.description.abstract This paper demonstrates a technique of high-resolution interrogation of two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) with flat-topped reflection spectra centered on 1649.55 nm and 1530.182 nm with narrow line width tunable semiconductor lasers emitting at 1651.93 nm and 1531.52 nm, respectively. The spectral shift of the reflection spectrum in response to temperature and strain is accurately measured with a fiber-optic Mach–Zehnder interferometer that has a free spectral range of 0.0523 GHz and a broadband photodetector. Laser wavelength modulation and harmonic detection techniques are used to transform the gentle edges of the flat-topped FBG into prominent leading and trailing peaks that are up to five times narrower than the FBG spectrum. Either of these peaks can be used to accurately measure spectral shifts of the FBG reflection spectrum with a resolution down to a value of 0.47 pm. A digital signal processing board is used to measure the temperature-induced spectral shifts over the range of 30°C–80°C and strain-induced spectral shifts from 0  μϵ0  μϵ to 12,000  μϵ12,000  μϵ. The shift is linear in both cases with a temperature sensitivity of 12.8 pm/°C and strain sensitivity of 0.12  pm/μϵ0.12  pm/μϵ. The distinctive feature of this technique is that it does not use an optical spectrum analyzer at any stage of its design or operation. It can be readily extended to all types of tunable diode lasers and is ideally suited for compact field instruments and for biomedical applications in stroke rehabilitation monitoring. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Anirban Roy, Arup Lal Chakraborty, and Chandan Kumar Jha
dc.format.extent Vol. 56, no. 12, pp. 3562-3569
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Optical Society of America en_US
dc.subject OCIS code: (060.3735) Fiber Bragg gratings en_US
dc.subject OCIS code: (280.4788) Optical sensing and sensors en_US
dc.subject OCIS code: (140.3490) Lasers, distributed-feedback en_US
dc.subject OCIS code: (300.6380) Spectroscopy, modulation en_US
dc.title Fiber Bragg grating interrogation using wavelength modulated tunable distributed feedback lasers and a fiber-optic Mach–Zehnder interferometer en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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