Vulnerability of urban waters to emerging contaminants in India and Sri Lanka: resilience framework and strategy

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dc.contributor.author Kumar, Manish
dc.contributor.author Chaminda, Tushara
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-07T11:19:22Z
dc.date.available 2019-12-07T11:19:22Z
dc.date.issued 2019-11
dc.identifier.citation Kumar, Manish; Chaminda, Tushara; Honda, Ryo and Furumai, Hiroaki, "Vulnerability of urban waters to emerging contaminants in India and Sri Lanka: resilience framework and strategy", APN Science Bulletin, DOI: 10.30852/sb.2019.799, vol. 9, no. 1, Nov. 2019. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2185-761X
dc.identifier.issn 2522-7971
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.30852/sb.2019.799
dc.identifier.uri https://repository.iitgn.ac.in/handle/123456789/5012
dc.description.abstract VULNERABILITY AND RESILIENCE of urban waters, under the shifting paradigm of climate change and urbanization, needs to be evaluated from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives. We evaluated the vulnerability of urban waters of Guwahati, the largest city in Northeastern India, and Colombo, the coastal National Capital Territory of Sri Lanka, by analyzing the concurrence of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs), enteric virus, antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB), metal, faecal contamination and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), as well as long-term changes in precipitation and temperature. Escherichia coli (E. coli) ranged from 10-27 cfu ml-1 in the Kelani river, and from below detection limit to 49 cfu ml-1 in the Brahmaputra. E. coli strains isolated from the water were evaluated for resistance to the antibiotics norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, kanamycin monosulphate, tetracycline and sulfamethoxazole. In both countries, most of the isolates were resistant to multiple drugs and the resistance was greater for older generation antibiotics. The Brahmaputra River showed greater resistance to all of the antibiotics than the Kelani and Gin rivers. Antibiotic resistance genes gyrA, tetW, sul1 and ampC were detected in the Kelani River, while aac-(6�)-1b-cr, gyrA, tetW, sul1, ampC and blaTEM were detected in the Brahmaputra River. Antibiotic resistance appears to be not correlated with the prevalence of PPCPs and E. coli, but with anthropogenic pollution and lifestyle. CSIRO and MIROC models predict more than a 1.2 �C increase in average yearly temperature, whereas average yearly precipitation is likely to remain the same, with some abnormalities in high and low extremes. A resilient framework is needed that ensures participation of every stakeholder by defining specific roles in the implementation process.
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Manish Kumar, Tushara Chaminda, Ryo Honda and Hiroaki Furumai
dc.format.extent vol. 9, no. 1
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research en_US
dc.title Vulnerability of urban waters to emerging contaminants in India and Sri Lanka: resilience framework and strategy en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.relation.journal APN Science Bulletin


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