Treatment enhances the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater of Sri Lanka, and India

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dc.contributor.author Kumar, Manish
dc.contributor.author Ram, Bhagwana
dc.contributor.author Sewwandi, Himaya
dc.contributor.author Sulfikar
dc.contributor.author Honda, Ryo
dc.contributor.author Chaminda, Tushara
dc.date.accessioned 2020-02-22T06:10:47Z
dc.date.available 2020-02-22T06:10:47Z
dc.date.issued 2020-01
dc.identifier.citation Kumar, Manish; Ram, Bhagwana; Sewwandi, Himaya; Sulfikar; Honda, Ryo and Chaminda, Tushara, “Treatment enhances the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater of Sri Lanka, and India”, Environmental Research, DOI: 10.1016/j.envres.2020.109179, vol. 183, Jan. 2020. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0013-9351
dc.identifier.issn 1096-0953
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2020.109179
dc.identifier.uri https://repository.iitgn.ac.in/handle/123456789/5156
dc.description.abstract Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are being debated for being the hot spots for the development of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic microbial communities. We observed the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), antibiotic resistance genes (ARG), and multidrug resistance (MDR) in two municipal WWTPs and one hospital WWTP in Western and Southern Sri Lanka, and compare the results with particular reference to Indian and the World scenario to trace the imprints of treatment on ARB and ARG. Result suggests that although wastewater treatment resulted in higher than 1.06 log Escherichia coli (E. coli) reduction at all WWTPs, yet the percent of E. coli resistant to most of the antibiotics increased from influent to effluent. Higher prevalence of ARB, ARG, and MDR were noted in hospital WWTP owing to the higher antibiotic concentrations used and excreted by the patients. With reference to India, the WWTPs in Sri Lanka showed more ARB and a consistent increase in its percentages after the treatment but were less resistant to Fluoroquinolone (FQ). E. coli strains isolated from each location of both countries showed multidrug resistance, which has increased after the treatment and was strongly correlated with FQ in every WWTP. Resistant genes for Fluoroquinolone (FQ) (aac-(6?)-1b-cr, qnrB, qnrS), ?-lactams (ampC), and sulphonamides (sul1) were common in all the wastewaters except additional parC gene in the hospital effluent of Sri Lanka, implying much higher resistance for quinolones, especially for Ciprofloxacin. Multivariate statistical treatments suggest that effluent showed higher loadings and association for MDR/ARB, where pH change and more extensive interaction with metals during the treatment processes seem to have profound effects.
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Manish Kumar
dc.description.statementofresponsibility Bhagwana Ram
dc.description.statementofresponsibility Himaya Sewwandi
dc.description.statementofresponsibility Sulfikar Honda
dc.description.statementofresponsibility Ryo and Tushara Chamindac
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.subject Antibiotic resistance en_US
dc.subject Antibiotic resistance genes en_US
dc.subject Multi-drug resistance en_US
dc.subject Wastewater en_US
dc.subject Sri Lanka en_US
dc.subject India en_US
dc.title Treatment enhances the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater of Sri Lanka, and India en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.relation.journal Environmental Research


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