From Transcript to "Trans-Script": Romanized Santali across semiotic media

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dc.contributor.author Choksi, Nishaant
dc.date.accessioned 2020-04-03T15:43:52Z
dc.date.available 2020-04-03T15:43:52Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.citation Choksi, Nishaant, "From Transcript to "Trans-Script": Romanized Santali across semiotic media", Signs and Society, DOI: 10.1086/706549, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 62-92, Winter. 2020. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2326-4489
dc.identifier.issn 2326-4497
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/706549
dc.identifier.uri https://repository.iitgn.ac.in/handle/123456789/5266
dc.description.abstract Santali is an Austro-Asiatic language spoken throughout eastern India, Nepal, and Bangladesh. It is currently written in multiple scripts, including a Roman script devised by missionaries in the late nineteenth century, various Indic scripts, and an independently derived script, Ol-Chiki. Each of these script systems entails different sound-to-script relationships, especially for phones such as the word-final glottalized consonants, which are not present in the dominant Indo-European vernaculars. This article traces the historical transformations of sound-to-script relations in the various scripts of Santali and tracks in particular a Romanized Santali transcription orthography that developed as a way to mediate between different scripts. The Romanized Santali form assumed a particular importance as Santali speakers started using Santali in digital and online spaces due to software limitations. However, the differing use of variants within the script to represent sounds such as word-final glottal consonants shows that what appears to be a novel orthography is in fact a �trans-script,� rhematizing the historical and ideological trajectories of the various script systems already in use in nondigital domains. The article claims that the Romanized "trans-script," though internally diverse, has been deployed to further the standardization project and cultural politics associated with the Ol-Chiki script.
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Nishaant Choksi
dc.format.extent vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 62-92
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher The University of Chicago Press en_US
dc.title From Transcript to "Trans-Script": Romanized Santali across semiotic media en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.relation.journal Signs and Society


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