Hydrometeorological processes and evaporation from falling rain in Indian sub-continent: Insights from stable isotopes and meteorological parameters

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dc.contributor.author Oza, Harsh
dc.contributor.author Ganguly, Akash
dc.contributor.author Padhya, Virendra
dc.contributor.author Deshpande, R. D.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-10-23T15:17:44Z
dc.date.available 2020-10-23T15:17:44Z
dc.date.issued 2020-12
dc.identifier.citation Oza, Harsh; Ganguly, Akash; Padhya, Virendra and Deshpande, R. D., "Hydrometeorological processes and evaporation from falling rain in Indian sub-continent: Insights from stable isotopes and meteorological parameters", Journal of Hydrology, DOI: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2020.125601, vol. 591, Dec. 2020. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0022-1694
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2020.125601
dc.identifier.uri https://repository.iitgn.ac.in/handle/123456789/5796
dc.description.abstract Rigorous analysis of measured isotopic composition (?18O and ?D) of 556 daily rainwater samples collected at four Indian stations viz., Jammu, Jorhat, Hyderabad and Ahmedabad, is done in conjunction with satellite and model derived meteorological and isotopic parameters to discern prominent hydrometeorological processes and factors in four different climatic zones in the Indian subcontinent. A new Indian Meteoric Water Line (IMWL), better representing the different climatic zones, including the semi-arid western India, has been defined: [?D = (7.6 � 0.1) ?18O + (8 � 1); R2 = 0.96; P < 0.05; N = 556]. The lower slope of IMWL compared to the Global Meteoric Water Line signifies the role of evaporation from falling rain throughout the Indian subcontinent, though it is surrounded by large marine water body, and bordered by lofty Himalayan mountains in the north obstructing the monsoonal winds. This study provides new quantitative insights about various hydrometeorological processes across the Indian subcontinent. Some of the important inferences drawn from this study are: (i) The estimated evaporative losses from falling raindrops for the four stations are [Jammu: Maximum 52% and Minimum 8%; Jorhat: Max 15% and Min 4%; Ahmedabad Min 8% and Hyderabad Max 29% and Min 15%]. (ii) Increased availability of surface waters due to flood in Brahmaputra River and high value (88%) of column averaged RH results in the lowest evaporative loss from falling raindrops at Jorhat in Northeast. (iii) The high Cloud Liquid Water Content (CLWC) over a longer span of altitude facilitates the interaction of falling raindrop with isotopically depleted ambient vapor and results in isotopically depleted rain. (iv) The observed inverse relationship between the evaporative loss from falling raindrop and the column averaged RH confirms that the post condensation kinetic processes are realistically accounted in this study. (v) Validation with measured isotope data of rain shows that the LMDZ-iso modelled rain fails to incorporate evaporative isotopic enrichment and generates negative bias.
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Harsh Oza, Akash Ganguly, Virendra Padhya and R. D. Deshpande
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.subject Hydrometeorological Processes en_US
dc.subject Rain Evaporation en_US
dc.subject Indian Subcontinent en_US
dc.subject Stable Isotopes en_US
dc.subject Indian Summer Monsoon en_US
dc.title Hydrometeorological processes and evaporation from falling rain in Indian sub-continent: Insights from stable isotopes and meteorological parameters en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.relation.journal Journal of Hydrology


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