Geomorphic characterization of a seasonal river network in semi-arid western India using the river styles framework

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dc.contributor.author Sonam; Jain Vikrant
dc.contributor.author Fryirs, Kirstie
dc.contributor.author Brierley, Gary
dc.coverage.spatial United States of America
dc.date.accessioned 2022-01-13T14:06:09Z
dc.date.available 2022-01-13T14:06:09Z
dc.date.issued 2022-06
dc.identifier.citation Sonam; Jain, Vikrant; Fryirs, Kirstie and Brierley, Gary, "Geomorphic characterization of a seasonal river network in semi-arid western India using the river styles framework", Journal of Asian Earth Sciences: X, DOI: 10.1016/j.jaesx.2021.100077, vol. 7, Jun. 2022. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2590-0560
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaesx.2021.100077
dc.identifier.uri https://repository.iitgn.ac.in/handle/123456789/7420
dc.description.abstract The imprint of geologic, climatic and anthropogenic memory as controls on geomorphic river diversity is assessed for twelve River Styles in the Sabarmati Catchment. Geologic controls are the primary determinant of river character and behavior in the hinterland and pediment landscape units, where headwater streams transition to partly confined valleys and gorges with distinct structural lineations in a rectangular drainage network. Climate memory imprints entrenched rivers that make up alluvial fan and alluvial plain landscape units of the mid-lower catchment, shaped by phases of sediment aggradation and subsequent incision in response to enhanced monsoonal rains around 10 ka. Terraces constrain channels within confined and partly confined valleys with occasional and discontinuous floodplains respectively. Laterally unconfined channels are only found in the lower parts of the catchment, immediately upstream of the estuary/delta. Limited space for adjustment, impacts of flow regulation and ephemeral conditions restrict the range of contemporary river morphodynamics, but ridges and swales and abandoned channels on floodplains indicate more dynamic conditions in the past. Impacts of anthropogenic memory are most pronounced in the stopbank-controlled, barrage- and dam-impacted reaches, especially in the cities of Gandhinagar and Ahmedabad. An explanation of controls upon geomorphic river diversity, including an assessment of the role of stream power, presents a coherent platform to develop geomorphologically-informed approaches to river management.
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Sonam Vikrant Jain, Kirstie Fryirs and Gary Brierley
dc.format.extent vol. 7
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.subject River diversity en_US
dc.subject Dryland river en_US
dc.subject Geologic memory en_US
dc.subject Climate change en_US
dc.subject Anthropogenic impact en_US
dc.subject River management en_US
dc.title Geomorphic characterization of a seasonal river network in semi-arid western India using the river styles framework en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.relation.journal Journal of Asian Earth Sciences: X


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